General Questions

  • What is National Standards accreditation?

    What is National Standards accreditation?

    The National Standards Accreditation Seal is an achievement recognizing accountability, transparency, and excellence by a community foundation. Community foundations that achieve National Standards accreditation have submitted a lengthy and rigorous application that has been reviewed by their peers and official program-trained reviewers in evaluations that take upwards of one year. Accreditation represents the rigorous levels of scrutiny applied by federal and state regulators to community foundations across the country. Achieving accreditation does not supplant direct engagement with lawmakers but works to strengthen outreach by underscoring that as an accredited institution, yours is a credible voice.

    Earning the National Accreditation Seal makes a community foundation distinct from other institutions. Community foundations use National Standards accreditation to distinguish themselves from entities that provide similar services. When community foundations work together regionally or nationally to raise awareness of their unique value, National Standards accreditation assures all participants that they have met the same benchmarks for quality in operations and service.

  • Who participates in National Standards?

    Who participates in National Standards?

    The National Standards Accreditation Program is for community foundations. Unlike private or corporate foundations that typically receive resources from a single source (e.g. a family or a company), community foundations are supported by a broad base of community members who bring together and leverage the financial resources of individuals, families, and businesses in support of people in the communities they serve. Community foundations that receive accreditation have met specific benchmarks for quality in operations and service that help distinguish them from entities providing similar services.

    92% of the nation’s largest community foundations participate in the National Standards program, and there are more than 500 accredited community foundations in the United States alone.

  • Who should get accredited and why?

    Who should get accredited and why?

    Community foundations of all sizes use National Standards as a roadmap to establish legal, ethical, effective practices that withstand the scrutiny of donors and regulators. With National Standards as a base, community foundations establish high levels of operational integrity, and seek to model how they are distinct in the rigor with which they follow the law and earn donor confidence and public trust.

    Skepticism about institutions is earned by some and unfairly applied to many. The dollars set aside for charity are limited and precious. Where misinformation and rumors run rampant, there can be no doubt about the level of care that accredited foundations apply to money that is meant to help others. The National Standards Seal helps donors and their professional advisers recognize and choose community foundations as a sound place to give and make a difference.

  • Who is eligible to get National Standards accreditation?

    Who is eligible to get National Standards accreditation?

    To qualify, a community foundation must be recognized by the IRS under Code sections 501(c)(3), 509(a)(1), and 170(b)(1)(a)(vi). This information confirms that a community foundation is a publicly supported charity that operates exclusively for charitable purposes. Applicants must also be in good standing with federal and state regulators and meet the National Standards definition of a community foundation as stated in National Standard 1.

  • Is there a list of accredited foundations?

    Is there a list of accredited foundations?

    The list is growing all the time. For the most current information, you can look for accredited organizations by state on the Community Foundation Locator.

  • What value does accreditation have for my organization?

    What value does accreditation have for my organization?

    The values of a community are expressed in the investments of its most treasured institutions. National Standards accreditation elevates the promise a community foundation makes to its partners and neighbors to raise their priorities as its own in the best ways it can, while embracing the scrutiny of elected leaders and regulators.

    National Standards Accreditation stands for:

    • Accountability: IRS tax code is intricate and complicated. National Standards Accreditation proves that the foundation not only exceeds federal requirements but is fluent in best practices for recordkeeping, reporting, and in making prudent investments.
    • Responsiveness: An accredited community foundation is nimble and creative in responding to community needs and uses funds only for qualified charitable purposes.
    • Integrity: National Standards Accredited Foundations have demonstrated that their foundation’s board and staff manage the operations and assets of the foundation independent of third-party influence.
    • Equity: Community foundations that achieve National Standards accreditation have proven that their resources represent the diversity of citizen support.
    • Engagement: Community foundations stand shoulder-to-shoulder with their neighbors and partners in the communities where they operate and National Standards Accreditation emphasizes the connectedness, commitment and leadership to those they work with and support.
  • Is this sanctioned (or even recognized) by the IRS?

    Is this sanctioned (or even recognized) by the federal or state government?

    Community foundations use National Standards to promote self-regulation in a manner viewed positively by legislative and regulatory staff and state charities officials, which have increased its scrutiny of charities, especially those offering donor-advised funds. The National Standards staff and board members meet with policymakers and regulators to explain the rigor of the program and that the majority of community foundations engage in self-regulation through accreditation.

  • What are the latest revisions to getting accredited?

    2015 Revisions

    1. Clarity, Sample Documents, and Checklists
      Overtime, it became unclear what actually passed Standards, but we are working with you to fix this.

      • We separated the legal requirements from the organization effectiveness requirements.
      • We are offering new and updated resources. Policy samples now include coversheets with law, best practices, and common mistakes.
    2. Online at Last! 
      For years, the cost of online accreditation software was prohibitive.  However, we’ve found a cost friendly solution that simplifies your renewal process. You will be able to:

      • Confirm your compliance with the full National Standards just once.
      • Annual updates to your accreditation will only ask about changes in your policies or the law.
    3. Streamlined Standards
      The Standards Action Team rigorously reviewed the National Standards and found the redundancies.

      • The new Standards retain the same level of rigor without the extra hoops to jump through.
      • New Standards are added to reflect changes to our work, like using social media.
    4. Up to 60% Time Savings
      Streamlined National Standards, new samples, online submission, and easy annual updates save you time and money:

      • Minimize staff time spent on accreditation without jeopardizing the program’s integrity.
      • Spend more time on the work that impacts your community.
    5. Easy to Budget
      Because accreditation will be updated annually, the cost of the program is now spread out over years. The initial online submission is $1,250 and annual renewal is $1,000 (subject to inflation).

     

    2017 Revisions

    In January 2017, the National Standards accreditation announced a new requirement for accreditation - a grant activity policy. This change was recommended by an advisory committee and accepted by the Council on Foundations and National Standards Boards of Directors. The rationale behind the policy was to demonstrate that community foundations work with donors to activate their giving rather than the incorrect perception that money is accumulated without charitable purpose over time in donor advised funds and endowments. The Council on Foundations legal team drafted a sample policy that is available in the Shared Library in the accreditation application.

  • How do I promote my community foundation's accreditation?

    The National Standards Seal and the Marketing Toolkit make it easy for your community foundation to share its achievement with the community. If you don't know your login, please email membership@cof.org for access to the toolkit. You do not need to be a member of the Council on Foundations to have access to the toolkit.

On Community Foundations

  • What is a community foundation?

    What is a community foundation?

    A community foundation is a tax-exempt, nonprofit, autonomous, nonsectarian philanthropic institution. Community foundations are focused locally and supported by local citizens with long-term goals of:

    • Building permanent funds established by many separate donors to carry out charitable interests
    • Supporting broad-based charitable interests and benefitting residents of a defined geographic area
    • Serving in leadership roles on important community issues

    Community foundations play a key role in identifying and solving community problems. In 2013, community foundations gave an estimated $5.2 billion to nonprofit activities in fields that included health and human services, the environment, education and disaster relief.

    Watch this video to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qXxFqccPCo

  • What’s the difference between a community foundation and other foundations?

    What’s the difference between a community foundation and other foundations?

    Foundations are nongovernmental, tax-exempt organizations with a principal fund managed by trustees or directors. Foundations maintain or aid charitable, educational, religious, or other activities serving the public good, primarily through the making of grants to other nonprofit organizations. Private foundations typically obtain funding from a single source such as an individual, family, or corporation. Community foundations are supported by a broad base of community members who bring together and leverage the financial resources of individuals, families, and businesses in support of people in the communities they serve. There are more than 750 community foundations in the United States and more than 1,800 worldwide.

    A “nonprofit” is an umbrella label that describes an organization where income is used for charitable or public interest rather than the private benefit or gain of any private individuals or shareholders. It is widely used to characterize a variety of charitable and non-charitable organizations, but is often used in a general manner to refer to charitable organizations.

  • Where does a community foundation get its money?

    Where does a community foundation get its money?

    Donors to community foundations can donate in several ways, including bequests and living trusts, and are invested in perpetuity. The investment earnings are then distributed to qualified organizations or causes.

  • Who are the donors to community foundations?

    Who are the donors to community foundations?

    Typically, donors to community foundations are residents interested in supporting challenges and/or opportunities of the local community.

  • Who decides how a community foundation spends its money?

    Who decides how a community foundation spends its money?

    Donors and the governing body - its Board of Trustees or Board of Directors. The nature of a community foundation is to reflect local needs and priorities and donors support local priorities with their gifts.

    Community foundations staff have in-depth knowledge of the issues, opportunities, and resources that shape the community, enabling them to play a key role in solving community problems, while helping donors learn more about local needs in order to make their giving as effective as possible.

  • Who provides oversight of community foundations?

    Who provides oversight of community foundations?

    A community foundation's governing body (e.g. its Board of Trustees or Board of Directors) maintains oversight and control of its funds. At the federal level, the IRS administers and enforces regulations on all nonprofits, including community foundations.

  • Where can I check to see if an organization is a community foundation?

    Where can I check to see if an organization is a community foundation?

    You can find community foundations in your area using the Community Foundation Locator

  • What laws affect community foundations and who enforces the laws?

    What laws affect community foundations and who enforces the laws?

    The United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) administers and enforces regulations on community foundations and all nonprofits. https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits

Non-Accredited Foundations Considering the Program

  • Do I have to be a Council on Foundations member to be involved with National Standards?

    Do I have to be a Council on Foundations member to be involved with National Standards?

    No, the two are separate. However, there are distinct benefits for each. 

    • The National Standards accreditation provides in-depth staff and board training and some sample documents. 
    • The Council on Foundations provides in depth resources such as board job descriptions and training on how to engage in different forms of community leadership such as impact investing, becoming an anchor institution (placemaker), and setting up disaster philanthropy in your community.

    Further, while the National Standards team can address some legal questions about your sample documents, the Council's legal team answers questions about interactions with donors, questions of how to use variance power, implementing scholarship programs, and so much more. These resources are unique Council membership benefits. In 2016, the Council invested $250,000, and its investments include the initial costs necessary to create the online application. 

  • How much does it cost to get accredited? Why is there a cost?

    How much does it cost to get accredited? Why is there a cost?

    A community foundation’s initial application fee is $1,250, and renewal costs $1,000. 

    To ensure that everyone receives a fair and consistent review for compliance, the review process is rigorous and reviewers are well trained. The fees paid by a community foundation help defray costs incurred during this process, which include minimal reviewer stipends, consultant costs, accreditation technology and software, and other operating costs.

  • How much time will it take to go through the accreditation process?

    How much time will it take to go through the accreditation process?

    National Standards accreditation takes between 12-18 months. The first review takes six months followed by several rounds of reviews for supplemental materials that traditionally take a few months each. The National Standards Board is constantly looking for ways to improve and streamline the process so that it is shorter in duration for applicants.

  • How long is accreditation valid?

    How long is accreditation valid?

    If your community foundation has been accredited via the online system, your accreditation is valid for one year. Accredited organizations are encouraged to review their initial online application at least three months before their renewal date in order to update and submit any information that has changed.

    For community foundations that were last accredited via the paper submission process, we recommend submitting your reaccreditation application 8-12 months prior to your renewal date to avoid a lapse in accreditation status. 

  • Where can I find samples of documents required by this application?

    Where can I find samples of documents required by this application?

    Once you establish an account in the online application system, you will have access to resources that give examples and help navigate the process.

  • Will I be able to get help during the application process?

    Will I be able to get help during the application process?

    Yes. Once you establish an account, you will have access to resources that give examples and help navigate the process.

    With an active account, you will have access to:

    • Sample documents - The Council on Foundations legal team provides high quality, vetted sample policies and procedures specifically tailored to community foundations.
    • Helpful Hints - Each sample document is accompanied by a cover sheet of helpful hints to help you think through what your policies and procedures should include and why.
    • E-Learning - For webinars or program updates, you can check out the The Program page.

    If you have not established an account yet, you can view a webinar tutorial (set aside some time, it is nearly two hours long) on the reasons why organizations participate and if you’re just getting started, tips on how to navigate the process. https://youtu.be/DWTjXyKIur0

  • Tips for Success

    Tips for Success

    Start early:

    Identify a point person and begin asking other key staff to familiarize themselves with National Standards a year or more in advance of your expected submission date (and that date should be 8-12 months prior to the expiration of your current accreditation). You’ll need time to review, create and compile the needed information and documents.

    No dumb questions:

    The National Standards website is a valuable resource. The website contains many sample documents and helpful hints. Support staff would rather help you in advance of your submission than engage in a long process of submissions and supplemental reviews. Use the knowledge and experience available to you.

    Samples:

    The sample policies provided within the online application system are an amazing resource. Be aware, however, that if it appears policies have been adopted without careful editing, discussion, and board review to ensure applicability to your individual community foundation, it will raise questions in review.

    You can’t go back to the future:

    Reviewers are required to find evidence that your board/ community foundation has adopted the policy. This might require submission of minutes documenting approval of the policy or, in the case of an IRS Form 990, either submitting a copy of an amended filing or a copy of the next year’s Form 990.

    Read instructions carefully:

    For some Standards, your community foundation is required to have a policy even if you don’t currently conduct that activity (such as availability of a Form 990-T or excess business holdings in donor-advised funds).

    Embrace sameness:

    Use a consistent format for fund agreements. Incorporate policies and terms and conditions by reference where possible, but submit every sample agreement in full – with all applicable addendums, exhibits or appendices.

    Cross-check:

    Reviewers look at all the information submitted. If you state you don’t offer scholarship funds and a reviewer notices the John Smith Scholarship Fund in your fund list, questions and requests for additional information will follow. Submit based on what is actually in place or what your organization would offer.

    Integrity:

    The process for submitting your information for Standards has been moved to the cloud, streamlined and improved. There are lots of yes and no questions, and if the answer is “no” your submission cannot go forward. Don’t say “yes” based on aspiration – only on reality.

    Excellence:

    Standards are a great learning tool for your board and staff. Compliance with National Standards represents a level of excellence your community foundation and board should be proud of. Set that tone as you approach this process. Enjoy the process!

    Practical advice:

    • Number pages within documents
    • Highlight key elements, such as the pertinent parts of board minutes or policies (and make sure the highlights translate to your scanned version)
    • Keep copies (paper or electronic) of EXACTLY the same version of documents as those you submit.
    • For yes/no questions, keep an internal document referencing the policy or evidence upon which your answer was based. This will be a crucial resource if questions arise in the review, when it’s time for reconfirmation, and for institutional history.

Accredited Community Foundations

  • I am already accredited, where do I find out the exact day that my accreditation expires?

    I am already accredited, where do I find out the exact day that my accreditation expires?

    Accreditation is valid for one year. Your annual renewal date is one year after you receive notice of your accreditation via email. Each year, you will review your original application and update any changes to your documents, policies, or responses to application questions. Your renewal application is available to be updated throughout the year as needed.

    To find your expiration date, locate your organization on the Community Foundation Locator.  

    Both renewal applications and payments must be received no less than 90 days before your accreditation expires. If accreditation lapses, the reinstatement application fee is $1,250.

  • What is the timeline for renewing my accreditation?

    What is the timeline for renewing my accreditation?

    For community foundations already accredited via the online application system, your annual renewal date is one year after you receive notice of your accreditation via email. We recommend that community foundations begin the renewal process three months before their accreditation expires.

    To find your expiration date, locate your organization on the Community Foundation Locator.

    Both renewal applications and payments must be received no less than 90 days before your accreditation expires. If accreditation lapses, the reinstatement application fee is $1,250.

    For community foundations that were last accredited via the paper submission process, we recommend submitting your reaccreditation application 8-12 months prior to your renewal date to avoid a lapse in accreditation status. 

  • What specific steps do I need to take to keep my accreditation current?

    What specific steps do I need to take to keep my accreditation current?

    Renewal applications only require information your community foundation has revised, or in response to changes in the law or the Standards themselves.

    To find the expiration date for your organization, use the Community Foundation Locator to find your community foundation on the map. 

On Reviewers and the Review Process

  • Who are the reviewers and how are they selected?

    Who are the reviewers and how are they selected?

    Reviewers are referred by their peers within the field and selected based on a number of factors which include years of experience in community foundation leadership, experience in leading a National Standards submission process for their community foundation, and passion for supporting philanthropic excellence.

    National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations reviewers have years of experience in community foundation leadership, and are passionate about National Standards and philanthropic excellence. Each reviewer signs a confidentiality agreement and is trained to determine a foundation’s compliance by conducting consistent and fair evaluations of the application.

    You can see bios on the current roster of reviewers on this website. 

  • How does the process work for reviewers?

    How does the process work for reviewers?

    The names of the reviewers of your application are confidential and all reviewers sign confidentiality and conflicts of interest documentation that are kept on file.

    Upon successful submission of both the application and payment, peer and legal review will begin.

    • First, the legal reviewer will review your application and make comments. 
    • Second, your application is sent to the peer reviewer for review and comments.
    • Third, your application is sent to the National Standards staff to combine the comments from both the legal and peer reviewer. These combined comments are then sent to you to respond to and provide additional information and documentation as requested. This cycle completes one round of review, with the possibility of a total of five rounds. 
  • Are reviewers paid?

    Are reviewers paid?

    Reviewers receive a small stipend upon completion of the final round of review. Some reviewers choose to volunteer their time.

  • How do you ensure consistent evaluation of applications between reviewers?

    How do you ensure consistent evaluation of applications between reviewers?

    New reviewers must complete an in-depth three- day orientation and training with National Standards staff. This includes training on the legal and regulatory requirements of the program and the National Standards and key element requirements. We have created a detailed checklist for the reviewer to follow when reviewing an application. 

  • What are the standards for reviewers?

    What are the standards for reviewers?

    Reviewers are referred by their peers within the field and selected based on a number of factors which include years of experience in community foundation leadership, experience in leading a National Standards submission process for their community foundation, and passion for supporting philanthropic excellence.

  • Does someone provide oversight of the reviewers?

    Does someone provide oversight of the reviewers?

    National Standards staff provides day-to-day oversight of and support to the reviewers.

  • I am interested in becoming a reviewer, how can I get involved?

    I am interested in becoming a reviewer, how can I get involved?

    We are always looking for new reviewers. Please look over the reviewer qualifications and expectations below. 

    National Standards reviewers are required to:

    • Understand the 26 National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations® 
    • Complete an initial review of submissions at the CFNSB offices in Arlington, VA, and reviews of supplemental materials remotely
    • Be responsive and willing to work with CFNSB staff to facilitate the supplemental review process in a timely manner
    • Provide written questions and comments for community foundations in language that is respectful, clear, and concise
    • Follow CFNSB confidentiality and conflict of interest policies 
    • Fulfill their duties successfully in order to receive a stipend of $100 for reconfirmation submissions and $150 for confirmation submissions

     

    Additional requirements to become a National Standards reviewer: 

    • Commit to attending a three-day National Standards training in Arlington, VA
    • Commit to reviewing at least five submissions  

     

    In reviewing applicants, the following factors will be considered:

    • Depth and range of experience at a community foundation
    • Experience working on a National Standards submission
    • Knowledge of the community foundation field
    • Diversity
    • Dedication

     

    If you want to learn more, or apply to be a reviewer, please contact National Standards staff at submissions@cfstandards.org.

  • Can reviewers be contacted directly?

    Can reviewers be contacted directly?

    The identity of the reviewers of your application is kept confidential from the applicant community foundation to ensure an equal review process for everyone. The National Standards staff are the only ones who can contact the reviewers directly.

On the National Standards Program and Board

  • What is the Community Foundations National Standards Board?

    What is the Community Foundations National Standards Board?

    The Community Foundations National Standards Board (CFNSB) is a supporting organization of the Council on Foundations. The CFNSB is responsible for the quality, value, and integrity of the National Standards program. The CFNSB ensures that the National Standards program, and the 26 National Standards of excellence it represents, remain relevant amid changing policies, procedures, and regulations.

  • Who created it and why?

    Who created it and why?

    The catalyst for the development of the National Standards program was a handful of scandals in the late 1990s that appropriately revealed and put a spotlight on bad actors in the charitable giving sector.

    The program was developed to give community foundations a specific mechanism through which they could model and demonstrate self-regulation, accountability, transparency and best practices within the nonprofit sector and to donors, regulators and lawmakers.

    2000
    • The Community Foundations Leadership Team (CFLT) – formed within the Council on Foundations – organizes the creation of an accreditation program
    • National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations adopted by The Council
    2005
    • National Standards program implemented and administered by peer reviewers and the CFLT’s Standards Action Team
    2006
    • Pension Protection Act passes resulting in changes to the program
    2009
    • Community Foundations National Standards Board becomes a Type I Supporting Organization of the Council on Foundations to carry out and advance the program
    2010
    • Five-Year Revisions Process implemented by the Standards Action Team
    2013
    • Standards Action Team meets to review and revise the 41 National Standards and recommends 26 National Standards to the Council on Foundations Board
    2014
    • Council on Foundations Board approves the Standards Action Team’s 26 National Standards and the CFNSB Process Revisions Committee streamlines the process and revisions presented at the October Community Foundations Conference in Cleveland
    2015
    • Revised National Standards program launches with an online application platform
    2017
    • Launch of updated National Standards website and streamlined online application platform designed to improve the accreditation process for applicants and amplify the benefits of the program to other stakeholders
  • Who runs National Standards?

    Who runs National Standards?

    The National Standards program receives oversight from the Community Foundations National Standards Board. The program is administered by the Council on Foundations, which hosts the National Standards Executive Director and other support staff.

  • Who is on the National Standards Community Foundation Board and how are they selected?

    Who is on the National Standards Community Foundation Board and how are they selected?

    The CFNSB has 11-15 voting members and an ex officio member, who is the National Standards Executive Director.

    Potential board members are selected by a CFNSB Nominations Committee which presents recommendations to the full board. Once the CFNSB has evaluated potential Board candidates, they make recommendations to the Council on Foundations Board, which votes to affirm them to the CFNSB.

    If you or someone you know would like to join the Community Foundations National Standards Board, please contact submissions@cfstandards.org, and we will forward your information to the Nominations Committee. We accept applications in the fall.

  • Are National Standards Board members paid?

    Are National Standards Board members paid?

    No. The National Standards Board members are volunteers. 

  • How was the application created, who decided what the qualifications would be to earn accreditation?

    How was the application created, who decided what the qualifications would be to earn accreditation?

    For nearly 20 years, the field has discussed and debated the definition of a community foundation. Numerous groups of peers have met on this definition and the latest iteration is a product of the Standards Action Team, which worked with the Council on Foundations through the Community Foundation Leadership Team. Today, Standards advisory committees will be convened from time to time to address the relevance of the National Standards and make edits that include a public comment process. 

    The accreditation application is regularly reviewed and updated to reflect changes in law and trends in charitable giving that could impact operations and effectiveness. A recent example of this is the implementation of the Fund Activity Policy requirement which became effective on January 1, 2017.

On the Council on Foundations

  • Do I have to be a Council on Foundations member to be involved with National Standards?

    Do I have to be a Council on Foundations member to be involved with National Standards?

    No, the two are separate. However, there are distinct benefits for each.

    • The National Standards accreditation provides in-depth staff and board training and some sample documents.
    • The Council provides in-depth resources such as board job descriptions and training on how to engage in different forms of community leadership such as impact investing, becoming an anchor institution (placemaker), and setting up disaster philanthropy in your community. Further, while the National Standards team can address some legal questions about your sample documents, the Council's legal team answers questions about interactions with donors, questions of how to use variance power, implementing scholarship programs, and so much more. These resources are unique Council membership benefits. In 2016, the Council invested $250,000, and its investments include the initial costs necessary to create the online application. 
  • What is the Council on Foundations?

    What is the Council on Foundations?

    The Council on Foundations, founded in 1949, is a nonprofit leadership association of grantmaking foundations and corporations. It provides the opportunity, leadership, and tools needed by philanthropic organizations to expand, enhance and sustain their ability to advance the common good. The Council empowers professionals in philanthropy to meet today's toughest challenges and advances a culture of charitable giving in the U.S. and globally. www.cof.org

  • What is the relationship between the National Standards program and the Council on Foundations?

    What is the relationship between the National Standards program and the Council on Foundations?

    The Council on Foundations provides management of the accreditation process while also promoting the importance of self-regulation with policymakers. The Council believes that Standards accreditation is important because it spotlights the rigorous rules that govern the sector and acknowledges those who meet and exceed the rules with accredited status.

  • How is the Council engaged with National Standards?

    How is the Council engaged with National Standards?

    The Council and the Community Foundations National Standards Board have a management agreement under which the Council provides:

    • Administration of the accreditation program
    • Information to policymakers on National Standards
    • Ongoing new member orientation and board development
    • Data, intelligence to inform strategic and policy decisions
    • Staffing, office space, back office, and other administrative services
    • Marketing and promotional materials, trademarks, and licensing
  • Does the Council weigh in on National Standards applications?

    Does the Council weigh in on National Standards applications?

    No. The Council’s primary role is to provide administrative support and management of the program that includes legal advice and guidance. As leaders in the philanthropic sector and engaged citizens in the communities where they live, the Council’s Board of Directors is also asked to be ambassadors of the National Standards program wherever they can promote the importance of transparency, accountability, and self-regulation in the sector.